5 Wildlife Apps to Use With Ours

5 Wildlife Apps to Use With Ours

These Free Wildlife Apps are Great Companions to Where’s The Wildlife and Can Truly Enrich Your Experience

Find Your Tribe

We at Where’s the Wildlife have noticed that a love and concern for nature tends to bring people together. NatureFind is an application that helps you do just that. Want to know what your local nature groups are up to? Learn about events happening wherever you are (or plan to be)? Then this app is a great place to start. Find others that share your passion for the outdoors.

Features
•Search or add local events (get the who, when and where)
•Search or add areas of particular interest and index them by activity (including wildlife viewing!)

All About National Parks

All the information you could possibly need about US National Parks. It doesn’t use data or wifi. It’s GPS enabled. And it’s free. This app is the perfect companion to those using Where’s the Wildlife in any of our National Parks. On a time limit and trying to decide which one to go to? National Parks by Chimani gives you up to date info about what’s where and how to get there in the National Parks.

Features

  • Use up to date maps to find and navigate your local parks (requires data/wifi)
  • Get the latest news about national parks near you
  • User friendly search functions to find what you need, when you need it: fast
https://youtu.be/WwFmLRIx-GU

For the Birds

Here’s a specific one for the bird watchers out there. Aubudon Bird Guide: North America is everything you could ever wish for in a mobile field guide. The sophisticated features are impressive and while they can be a little slower in remote mountain areas (as it works using data), they are absolutely worth the wait.

Features
• Use their unique identification system to quickly find out just what you’re looking at
• Access general and migratory information about over 800 species of bird
• Admire some beautiful professional photography they’ve put up on their gallery
• Keep a list of your sightings and share them with friends!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67WtETnB32k

What Am I Looking At?

Sometimes it’s hard to tell one chubby rodent from another, or differentiate between species of butterflies or types of deer. Map of Life seeks to assist. This application has an ambitious goal: bringing you information about over 30,000 species from around the world. Their database is user driven and growing. While it’s still being developed to bring more and more content, we can see a lot of potential!

Features
• Identify just what you’ve seen
• Learn about species around you and where else they can be found
• Record and share about your animal sightings (syncs with www.mol.org)

https://youtu.be/XGRfR0P-ym0

Pretty Pictures

For those times the photographer in you wants to take your wildlife picture to a new level (and you can’t access your heavy duty photo editing software), Google has create an app for you. Snapseed is rapidly becoming the smartphone photographer’s best friend. With a plethora of filters, effects and corrections, it can help your photos rise to their true potential.

Features
• You don’t need to be a professional: Easy to use
• Tons of cool filters and textures to add
• Basic photo editing abilities like crop, rotate and transform
• Selective adjustment ability (for contrast, saturation, etc…)

https://youtu.be/ehfk05NytL8

Disclaimer
Where’s The Wildlife has not received any monetary or other endorsement from these applications or their parent organizations. They are on this list because they deserve to be.


Got any more app suggestions? Do you have a wildlife app you cannot live without? Share it with us here!

Wildlife Photography Simple Tips

Wildlife Photography Simple Tips

Wildlife photography is challenging whether you are using a smartphone or other mobile device. Smartphone cameras have come light years away from their starting point and their quality is now exceptional.  Remember to set your time/date stamp when using the WWL App.   As a subject, wildlife is challenging to capture in images because it is elusive.  One small movement or sound can ruin the shot and it make take hours to capture it again.

Too Small in the Frame?

Generally speaking, it’s nearly impossible to get close to wildlife, especially if you are following the Wildlife Code of Conduct.   The key is to remember that timing, patience and concentration bring the results you want.  The more you know about your subject’s habits, habitat, what it eats and social behaviors will help you determine how and where to photograph.

Out of Focus?

You have to select the AF (auto focus) point yourself. Don’t let the camera automatically do it because it’ll hone in on the center of the frame, even if your subject isn’t in the center. Look for an option like “single-point AF” or “Flexible-spot AF”.

Select the point that’s on the subject’s head and half-press the shutter release to focus your lens. If it’s moving, use “Continuous AF mode” to refocus between shots.

Blurry Wildlife Shots?

Using a tripod or monopod to keep the camera steady can be a great asset, especially for long lenses. This is true for mobile devices and even GoPros.  You also need to have a fast shutter speed that can freeze any movement. If you’re unable to get the shutter speed high enough, you can either push the sensitivity setting up a little or just wait until the subject is still and completely avoid shooting when it’s moving.  Remember that using a high sensitivity setting will cause a bit of noise. Shoot either in shutter priority or manual exposure mode so that you can control the shutter speed yourself.

If you are using a smart phone, look for a tree or a rock that can keep you steady as you shoot your photos.  Even leaning close to a family member or friend can allow you the steadiness to keep clicking good shots.

Don’t rely on Smartphone auto mode

Yes, tapping on where you want the phone to focus on will give you a sharper focus on the subject. However, you can improve the overall quality of your images by tweaking the other aspects in an image. Although different phones have different settings, most should be able to let you control the focus, exposure, white balance and ISO.

The higher the resolution of your photo, the better your quality will be. When taking images with a smartphone camera, try to go as close as possible to the subject rather than zooming in when you take a shot. You will get better-resolution photos cropped, than zoomed in.

Use a tripod or monopod

Your phone camera’s stabilizing function can only do so much and if you don’t want a blurred image, consider using tripods and monopods.

Be careful with flash

The camera flash you have on your phone is almost always too harsh and rarely helpful. Instead try increasing your camera’s exposure and ISO levels.

Learn to use your smartphone’s camera software

You’d be surprised at just what your smartphone camera can do.  Maybe you’re familiar with some of the basic operations, like switching between the camera and video modes, or turning your flash on and off or putting it on auto. Yet your camera probably has several other options like scenemodes, panorama, bokeh and HDR.

Explore your iPhone or Andorid device’s camera. It has plenty of memory for photos, so you can play with the different features, effects and settings and snap lots of photos.  Your goal is to know your way around the camera so that you can snap photos easefully and won’t miss those rare moments when you can catch wildlife in their environment.